Voter I.D. laws upheld in District Court

voter prepares to show a photo I.D. at Cameron Village library polling station in Raleigh.

A voter prepares to show a photo I.D. at Cameron Village library polling station in Raleigh on October 6, 2016. (North State Journal)

GREENSBORO, N.C. – The U.S. District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina has upheld the voter I.D. laws passed by Republicans in 2013.

The lead plaintiff in the case, the NAACP of North Carolina, was asking the court for an injunction against voter I.D. requirements, arguing the law was discriminatory in nature and did not serve the public interest.

“In sum, granting an injunction at this time would (1) negate substantial and adequate educational efforts by the State, (2) increase rather than ameliorate voter confusion, (3) offer only a speculative benefit, and (4) excuse Plaintiffs’ delay.  As such, in addition to finding above that the NAACP Plaintiffs are not likely to succeed on the merits, the balance of the equities and public interest do not favor an injunction,” said Federal District Court Judge Thomas D. Schroeder in his opinion.

“This ruling further affirms that requiring a photo ID in order to vote is not only common-sense, it’s constitutional,” said Gov. McCrory in reaction to the court’s ruling.

The ruling:

  • upholds voter I.D. requirement;
  • ends same-day voter registration;
  • shortens early voting by seven days; and
  • approved the repeal of a provision that allowed for voters to cast ballots outside of their home precinct.

The NAACP of NC has appealed the ruling.  It will go on to the U.S. Court of Appeals 4th circuit in Richmond, Virginia.