Presidential cheat sheet: Monday, Feb. 22

Jill Osborn.

Jill Osborn.

The North State Journal continues to bring you a weekly update of the race to the White House. We’ll provide a weekly wrap-up of the controversial comments and breakdown of the top candidates every week so that you can stay up to date.


On the Democratic Side:

Nevada Results:

Hillary Clinton: 52.7% 

Bernie Sanders: 47.2%

Hillary Clinton claims a victory in Nevada narrowly defeating Bernie Sanders. Since Clinton was crushed by Sanders in New Hampshire, Nevada was a win the former Secretary needed. Although, just five weeks ago Sanders was about 25 points behind in the polls. So is Sanders gaining on Clinton? Clinton does not believe so.

Hillary Clinton: “Some may have doubted us but we never doubted each other,” Clinton said during her victory speech. “And this one is for you.” She goes on to thank the voters for turning out. “This is your campaign. It is. A campaign to break down every barrier that holds you back.”

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Bernie Sanders: Sanders congratulated Clinton on her win, but also added, “Taking on the establishment — whether it is the financial establishment, whether it is the political establishment, whether it is the media establishment — is not easy.” More Sanders: “What this entire campaign has been about is the issue of momentum, is the issue of bringing more and more people into the political process.”

Sanders had more votes than anticipated with Latinos. However, Clinton secured the African-American votes, as expected. Clinton is also hoping to clinch those votes in the Southern states as well. The Democratic primary is next Saturday in South Carolina. Polls show Clinton has a big lead in the Palmetto state.

Clinton is heading to Texas to campaign before Super Tuesday. Texans take to the polls on March 1. Then, she will be in South Carolina. Meanwhile, Sanders will head to Virginia early next week and then to South Carolina.


Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at his 2016 South Carolina presidential primary night victory rally in Spartanburg, South Carolina February 20, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at his 2016 South Carolina presidential primary night victory rally in Spartanburg, South Carolina February 20, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

On the Republican Side:

South Carolina Results:

Donald Trump: 32.5%

Marco Rubio: 22.5%

Ted Cruz: 22.3%

Jeb Bush: 7.8%

John Kasich: 7.6%

Ben Carson: 7.2%

A historic number of voters came out to South Carolina’s primary as Donald Trump dominated the GOP race. Historically, any GOP candidate who has won South Carolina and New Hampshire has always secured the Republican nomination. But Marco Rubio argues his second-place finish makes this a three-man race. While Ted Cruz claims that, since the results were so tight, it is basically just him and Donald Trump as the top two contenders.

Jeb Bush gave an emotional concession speech and said he will be suspending his campaign. John Kasich will not give up and neither will Ben Carson, despite their poor performances.

What is making headlines today are the latest attacks on Rubio. Trump questioned whether Rubio was eligible to run for president.

Donald Trump: On ABC’s “This Week,” Trump addressed whether he thought Rubio was able to run. He told George Stephanopoulos, “I really – I’ve never looked at it, George. I honestly have never looked at it. As somebody said, he’s not. And I retweeted it. I have 14 million people between Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and I retweet things, and we start dialogue and it’s very interesting.”

Marco Rubio: Rubio had this to say in response. “This is a game he plays. He says something that’s edgy and outrageous and then the media flocks and covers that. And then no one else can get any coverage on anything else. And that worked where there were 15 people running for president. It’s not going to work anymore. I’m going to spend zero time on his interpretation of the Constitution with regards to eligibility.”

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio applauds as he approaches the podium to speak to supporters at a South Carolina primary night rally in Columbia, South Carolina February 20, 2016.    REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio applauds as he approaches the podium to speak to supporters at a South Carolina primary night rally in Columbia, South Carolina February 20, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane

 

Ted Cruz: South Carolina was supposed to be a strong state for Cruz but he ended up falling a bit short. Cruz said after the primary: “Tonight, despite millions of millions of dollars of false and nasty attacks, despite the entirety of the political establishment coming together against us, South Carolina has given us another remarkable result.”

Nevada is the next stop for the Republican candidates.